On One Hand

December 4, 2005

Another Reason to Hate Journalism

Filed under: Uncategorized — ononehand @ 11:30 pm
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Helen Jones’ world is a machine.

In an oppressive nightmare of two-dimensional personalities and illusory options, she marries her intimidating boss under pressure and has a child she doesn’t want. She catches a glimmer of hope when she falls in love with a rugged romantic, only to return later to the onerous reality of her callous and patronizing husband who only tells her to relax.

Machinal, performed by CU’s Theater and Dance department from Nov. 17 through Dec. 4, is about a New York City woman’s struggle against a machinelike world that dictates her life and decisions. The play is set at the height of industrialism in the 1920s.

“She’s kind of forced to get married by society, she’s not happy with her marriage, and she has a child and doesn’t really want it,” said Senior Jennifer Blake, a theatre major who was Dresser and Scene Shop Assistant for Machinal.

The intimidating setting is dull and gray. Faces are sullen and expressionless. Arms and legs move in stiff, robotic jerks. Everything that surrounds Helen Jones is a part of one metallic, inescapable process.

“The play is about the oppression of this woman’s world around her,” said Senior Briann Gagnon, a theatre major who played the Stenographer.

Written in the late 1920s by Sophie Treadwell as one of the first mainstream feminist plays, Machinal is based on the real-life trial and execution of Ruth Schneider, who scandalously murdered her husband with a man she was having an affair with.

But Unlike Ruth Schneider, Helen Jones is shown to be a victim rather than an assailant.

“To arouse this empathy for the character, the character had to be made more sympathetic,” Gagnon said.

Hellen Jones is emotional, conflicted, and desperate, tossing helplessly through her contrived world like a fly in a pan of sloshing water. Her husband, a towering plutocrat, is too focused on himself and his own success to notice her needs.

Helen Jones’ world is a machine. (UNCHANGED)

In an oppressive nightmare of two-dimensional personalities and illusory options, she marries her intimidating boss under pressure and has a child she doesn’t want. She catches a glimmer of hope when she falls in love with a rugged romantic, only to return later to the onerous reality of her callous and patronizing husband who only tells her to relax. (UNCHANGED)

Machinal, Written in the late 1920s by Sophie Treadwel, is one of the first mainstream feminist plays, and is based on the real-life trial and execution of Ruth Schneider, who scandalously murdered her husband accompanied by a man she was having an affair with. <– AHH! THAT SENTENCE IS OVER 40 WORDS LONG! (15-20 words per sentence is ideal for news writing.)

CU’s Theater and Dance department performs the play, which is set at the height of industrialism in the 1920s, from Nov. 17 through Dec. 4. UH…TECHNICALLY THE PLAY IS OVER…AND HOW IS INDUSTRIALISM RELATED TO THE THEATRE DEPARTMENT? WHY WAS THAT DETAIL MOVED HERE???

Unlike the real-life character Ruth Schneider, however, in Machinal the character Helen Jones is shown to be a victim rather than an assailant. <– THAT IS THE MOST AWKWARD SENTENCE I HAVE EVER SEEN IN PRINT IN MY ENTIRE LIFE.

“She’s kind of forced to get married by society, she’s not happy with her marriage, and she has a child and doesn’t really want it,” said Senior Jennifer Blake, a theatre major who was Dresser and Scene Shop Assistant for Machinal. WAIT – WHAT THE HELL DOES THAT QUOTE HAVE TO DO WITH HELEN BEING UNLIKE RUTH? WHY WAS IT MOVED HERE!?!?

The intimidating setting is dull and gray. Faces are sullen and expressionless. Arms and legs move in stiff, robotic jerks. Everything that surrounds Helen Jones is a part of one metallic, inescapable process.

“The play is about the oppression of this woman’s world around her,” said Senior Briann Gagnon, a theatre major who played the Stenographer.

“To arouse this empathy for the character, the character had to be made more sympathetic,” Gagnon said. THIS IS WHY HELEN IS ULIKE RUTH. THIS QUOTE SHOULD BE WHERE THE OTHER ONE IS.

Hellen Jones is emotional, conflicted, and desperate, tossing helplessly through her contrived world like a fly in a pan of sloshing water. Her husband, a towering plutocrat, is too focused on himself and his own success to notice her needs. THIS ALSO EXPLAINS WHY HELEN IS UNLIKE RUTH, AND SHOULD SIMILARLY BE UP WITH THE QUOTE. OR THE LINE, “Unlike the real Ruth Schneider…” SHOULD BE MOVED DOWN TO PRECEDE THESE TWO GRAFS.

(THE REST OF THE STORY IS UNCHANGED)

OH MY GOD. I don’t even want my name on the second one. I called up my editors and said they should fix everything awkward, since at this point there’s no time to revert back to the original before print on Tuesday.

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1 Comment »

  1. Unlike the real-life character Ruth Schneider, however, in Machinal the character Helen Jones is shown to be a victim rather than an assailant.

    Well now, that is quite confusing

    Comment by lancerboi — December 5, 2005 @ 6:56 am | Reply


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