On One Hand

August 30, 2006

Closure

Filed under: Uncategorized — ononehand @ 8:10 pm
Tags: ,

It’s a good idea to end articles and essays with something profound and snappy, so then, as a writer, you seem poetic and thoughtful. It’s allright if the ending has little to do with the content of the essay – floury endings rarely fit perfectly, but if the image is intense enough it doesn’t matter. Remember you’re hitting for the emotive section of the reader’s brain, not the rational eye. So from now on everything I write will conclude with the following line I came up with today while running to the gym:

“So she cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born.”

Observe how the line enhances everything it is added to. First, I spliced it on the following article published in the Campus Press on Tuesday, January 24, 2006 (Cut drastically for Length):

“Spring recruitment successful despite lower numbers” By Matt Pizzuti, Staff Writer

About 341 women received bids to join sororities at CU in the face of unideal circumstances Wednesday night in this year’s formal recruitment, said Membership Recruitment Coordinator Bailey Donovan.

Panhellenic President Katie Matthews, a senior integrative physiology major, said deferred recruitment has put sororities at a disadvantage, explaining, “we miss a full semester of getting membership dues.” She noted that the money lost can reach up to $30 thousand a year in some houses.

“Our numbers are lower now,” she said. “I still think fall recruitment is best for this campus. The sororities will try to go back to fall recruitment sometime.”

In spite of inconvenience, CU’s greek community is hopeful. Together they can cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born.

Along with news articles, the snappy closing line can add to a serious letter. Here’s a semi-formal email I wrote to my student newspaper’s editor this morning (without the addition), with the hypothetical closing sentence added to strengthen the message:

Stephanie, I was wondering if you were planning on making old articles written during Spring semester 2006 available on the current website in the CP archives. I was searching for my old articles with links I’d saved and found that the links no longer lead to anything on the new site. I’d also like to know if new articles written from this point forward will have permanent links that will be reliable for years to come. I think that all of us, as reporters, would like to see that happen since we can’t cut anything out of a physical paper to show for clips when the article is published only online – and if we can’t count on the articles surviving on the website we have no future evidence that our articles were even published. I’m hoping we can cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born. Thanks, Matt Pizzuti

The benefits multiply when the poetic verse is added to the most informal of letters, adding a sensitive and compassionate touch to messages that might otherwise come across as bitchy or unnecessary. Here is the line added to a note one of my roommates scribbled to the rest of us about the appearence of our house:

Hey, guys, right now the house looks like shit, especially the kitchen. Could we all try to find a time to get together and clean it up? Also, I paid the cable bill and need $18 from all of you ASAP. Lets cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born.

Last but not least, the line can stand alone in naked decontextualization to enhance notices for important transitions in a person’s life. That includes wedding invitations, obituaries, first communion announcements or baptisimal certificiats, to add a heartfelt touch to an otherwise plain and uninteresting schedule of events. For added significance the line can be attributed to one of the parties involved in important occasion.

An example, a generic fictional text of a remembrance card commonly handed out at funerals, with the special line added in to make the message not-so-generic in the end:

Lucille Allen
1937 – 2006
Loving mother, sister, grandmother and aunt,
schoolteacher and inspiration to many.

“She cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born”
– Lucille to a former student three weeks before her death

Clearly the line is a boon to any sort of writing. I encourage anyone reading this to come up with your own little signature prose and use it whenever necessary. I know I will – with the line I will cut open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born.

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3 Comments »

  1. You are a genius!

    Comment by twiggyliz — August 31, 2006 @ 3:47 am | Reply

  2. jackie, again

    matt, you aren’t in any of my classes! still, we should hang out. i’d like to see the new, buff you, and perhaps, should i be so lucky, witness you cutting open those walls of twilight, to beyond them find a hundred new days waiting to be born.

    Comment by Anonymous — September 5, 2006 @ 3:10 am | Reply


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