On One Hand

October 1, 2008

Register to Vote

Filed under: Uncategorized — ononehand @ 7:43 pm

State voter registration deadlines are rapidly approaching, beggining this Saturday. Have you registered – or if your answer is “maybe,” have you been on your state Secretary of State website or called your county clerk to check your status?

Have you gotten all your siblings, roommates, and friends to register in time for the deadline?

Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Virgina, New Hampshire, Ohio, North Carolina, Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa and Pennsylvania are listed as crucial “swing states.” If you live in one of these states, voting is vital.

But

The chance for an electoral college tie is higher this year than in recent history. Why? Because if Obama wins in all the states that John Kerry won except New Hampshire, plus Iowa, Colorado and New Mexico, John McCain and Barack Obama will each have 169 electoral votes.

Which Bush states gives Obama the highest margins? Iowa, Colorado and New Mexico. What Kerry state looks to be the toughest for Obama? New Hampshire.

In the case of an electoral college tie, the House of Representatives picks the president by state delegation. The House will be under overwhelming pressure to pick the winner of the national popular vote. Swing states will still garner most attention, but even if your state is a firm “blue” or “red” state, your vote could be crucial.

(The other chance for an electoral college tie has Barack Obama losing Colorado but winning Nevada.)

The deadline to register to vote in Nevada is October 4.

The deadline to register to vote in Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Florida, Virginia and Indianna is October 6.

The deadline to register to vote in New Mexico is October 7.

The deadline to register to vote in Wisconsin is October 15.

The deadline to register to vote in Iowa is October 24.

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1 Comment »

  1. The National Popular Vote bill

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC).

    Every vote would be politically relevant and equal in presidential elections.

    The bill would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the electoral votes-that is, enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538). When the bill comes into effect, all the electoral votes from those states would be awarded to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC).

    So there would never be a tie in the electoral vote, because the compact always represents a bloc consisting of a majority of the electoral votes. Thus, an election for President would never be thrown into the House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote) and an election for Vice President would never be thrown into the Senate (with each Senator casting one vote).

    The National Popular Vote bill has passed 21 state legislative chambers, including one house in Arkansas, Colorado, Maine, North Carolina, and Washington, and both houses in California, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The bill has been enacted by Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, and Maryland. These four states possess 50 electoral votes – 19% of the 270 necessary to bring the law into effect.

    See http://www.NationalPopularVote.com

    susan

    Comment by Anonymous — October 2, 2008 @ 6:26 pm | Reply


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